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Now browsing: Hometown News > Business Columns > Earl Stewart

Earl Stewart
This Week | Archive


Beware of direct mail car advertising
Rating: 2.56 / 5 (18 votes)  
Posted: 2012 Aug 31 - 02:53

Earl Stewart is the owner and general manager of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach. The dealership is located at 1215 N. Federal Highway in Lake Park. Contact him at www.earlstewarttoyota.com, call (561) 358-1474, fax (561) 658-0746 or email earl@estoyota.com. Listen to him on Seaview AM 960, FM 95.9 and FM 106.9, which can be streamed at www.SeaviewRadio.com every Saturday morning between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m.

Of course, you should be careful of all advertising ... newspaper, TV, and radio, but direct mail can be especially deceptive. The reason this is so is because direct mail usually "flies beneath the radar" of the regulators. There are so many ads in violation of rules and laws that the regulators are overwhelmed. They focus on the most visible ads, often the ones that they see themselves, in the newspaper or on TV. Direct mail represents a very small percent of total advertising. One reason for this is that it is considered, by many advertising agencies, to be too expensive and relatively ineffective. I believe, that the only way to make direct mail effective for many advertisers, is to use deception.

I have a couple of direct mail pieces on my desk and will cite some examples of this deception. "We'll will buy back your present vehicle for up to $5,000 over current Kelly Blue Book Value on trade towards the purchase of a brand new Toyota or pre-owned model.***" The asterisk is for the very fine print disclosure on the back of the letter which reads: On select models. Discounts and rebates will vary from model to model. Of course, with the two words "up to" in front of the $5,000, no disclosure is really necessary. Buying back your present vehicle for $1 over current Kelly Blue Book Value is technically "up to"$5,000.

Attached to the letter is a something that looks like a check made payable to the recipient for $8,207. Here we go again with the "up to". "You can apply this registered voucher for a discount 'up to' $8,207 off MSRP on a new Toyota." Of course there is another asterisk that states "on select models."

But there's more! "Just for attending this event, you will receive 5 "golden" $1 coins as a gift, and you may have won $100, $250, $50, or possibly even $4,500 cash!" We, of course, have another asterisk which says that your odds of winning anything are 1 in 25,000. I often wonder who responds to these ads, not understanding the difference between a "golden coin" and a gold coin. Or, who really think they have a reasonable chance to win anything.

It's not over yet! "Every application for credit will be immediately submitted and processed for approval and on-the-spot delivery regardless of past credit history . Of course, the operating key word here is "submitted". There is "no guarantee of "approval." They will simply "submit" your application to the bank and if you have bad credit, the bank will reject your application.

"During this weekend event, any new Toyota or used vehicle could be purchased with zero cash down!" The key word here is "could" instead of "can." Of course, there is the old asterisk, which, if you can find and then read the fine print, it says "with approved credit." You have to have a very high Beacon score to buy a new or used car with zero down payment. Less than one percent of car buyers would have this high of a Beacon score. There is also a phrase that says, "cash down is not suggested." This dealer might not suggest it, but I can almost guarantee the bank will not only suggest it but also demand it.

"Due to overwhelming response and customer request, I would like to again offer you a personal invitation to receive 80 percent off of the base original MSRP for the car you are currently driving." This promise doesn't even have an asterisk. Of course the base MSRP excludes accessories. Sometimes an offer is so ridiculous that you wonder who would ever believe it. Ask yourself how any car dealer could promise to pay 80 percent of the new base MSRP on a used car that they have never seen. They don't know how many miles are on the car, whether it has been wrecked, or even if the car will still run.

Direct mail claims like those above, unfortunately, do work. People actually come in and buy cars. Unfortunately, these ads prey on those who are uneducated, have difficulty reading English or are simply gullible. My advice is to ignore all car dealers' direct mail solicitations. I'm not saying that 100 percent are phonies, but 99 percent are, and the odds are so overwhelming, you're better safe than sorry.




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